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T Magazine: Happenings | A Literary Festival in Paradise

Written By wartini cantika on Jumat, 30 Mei 2014 | 17.36

Jamaica's rocky, arid south coast is refreshingly low on tourist traffic compared with the bustling north — which is just how fans of the beloved bohemian hideaway Jake's Hotel like it. This weekend, 27 modern literary legends will descend upon the rural seaside town of Treasure Beach for the annual Calabash International Literary Festival, a three-day conference consisting of readings and themed discussions with Salman Rushdie, Zadie Smith, Colum McCann, Jamaica Kincaid, Paul Muldoon and other luminaries. It began in 2001, when the novelist Colin Channer joined forces with the poet Kwame Dawes and the producer Justine Henzell, whose mother built Jake's, to bring a world-class cultural event to their favorite place on the planet.

In keeping with the town's anything-goes vibe, Calabash is free and open to the public. At each event, as many as 3,000 people ranging from local fishermen to New York literati gather at Jake's, on a lawn by the sea, to listen and learn. Between the readings and deeper into the night, guests can participate in open-mic sessions, catch reggae shows, shop booths of handcrafted wares from Caribbean artisans and dine on spicy Jamaican fare. Musical happenings this year include a sound clash between the Mobb Deep member Prodigy and the British rapper Akala, along with a host of emerging Jamaican talent ranging from dancehall to acoustic rock.

For a small rural town, Treasure Beach has surprising artistic bona fides. Alex Haley wrote "Roots" there in a modest cottage built by Henzell's grandparents. Henzell's father, Perry Henzell, directed and co-wrote "The Harder They Come," Jamaica's first cinematic hit, which featured an iconic reggae soundtrack. Her mother, Sally Henzell, is a self-taught artist, architect and poet who founded Jake's and designed its distinctive stucco structures, which incorporate colorful glass bottles and tree branches. Artists, fashion designers and photographers check in regularly.

Treasure Beach is also unique among Jamaican getaways for its inclusiveness — not in the drinks-are-free sense, but in the way locals and vacationers intermingle. Jake's is the town's social hub for residents as well as visitors, and through a 16-year-old nonprofit called Breds, the hotel has helped to give back to the community via a sprawling sports park, a fish sanctuary, literacy programs and other initiatives.

It all makes for an inspiring way to experience the spoken word. "Jamaica itself is an island of poetry," Justine Henzell says. "The rhythm of our speech and the way we move is lyrical; there are wordsmiths and storytellers all around us."

For more information, visit calabashfestival.org and treasurebeach.tumblr.com.


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In Transit Blog: A Chicago Hotel Honors a Street Photographer

A street photographer who worked in obscurity from the mid-'50s until her death in 2009, Vivian Maier is now the subject of a theatrically released documentary, a BBC special and, most recently, the lobby of the Radisson Blu Aqua Hotel, Chicago.

Ms. Maier, who spent her career working as a nanny in affluent Chicago suburbs, gets a showcase at the 334-room downtown hotel with 11 black-and-white limited edition prints.

Hanging in the newly renovated lobby, the images of a blues musician, the overhead El train tracks and various characters offer a time-capsule glimpse of late-20th-century Chicago.

"It's all about what we felt was Chicago," said the hotel general manager Pierre-Louis Giacotto. "Every picture speaks to you about that era or the person behind it. She had a very, very good eye for seeing what common people don't see."

The photographs are visible to guests and visitors in the lobby and expand the cultural appeal of the hotel, which is housed in the acclaimed Aqua building designed by the architect Jeanne Gang.


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In Transit Blog: A Wine Week in London

As Paris, the capital of wine-loving France, wraps up its beer week festival, London, more known for ales and pubs, is uncorking its first wine week.

For 10 pounds, or $16.80, participants can register for a satiny white wristband that allows them to belly up at more than 130 venues from June 2 to 8 and pay just £5 for a glass or, at some locations, a flight of wine.

Quality crus are normally far pricier than that in London, and the festival is a chance to taste higher-end harvests that normally are available only by the bottle.

"A lot of younger people now are starting to care more about what they're drinking,'' the festival's manager, Siobhan Payne, said in an interview recently. "We wanted to harness that, and get even more people drinking really good wine, instead of just ordering the house white.''

While London Wine Week is an effort to highlight what organizers call the "emerging and passionate" wine scene in London, it also includes master classes, wine dinners and special events that focus on vineyards from countries like New Zealand, Lebanon and South Africa.

Wristbands can be picked up at any of three collection points: a pop-up bar with Riedel stemware off Carnaby Street in central London; the Laithwaite's wine store near London Bridge, which will be turned into a Spanish-themed tasting center; and at Harvey Nichols in Knightsbridge, where participants can print personalized wine bottle labels.

Other "really smart" wine week venues, according to Ms. Payne, include the Royal Exchange Grand Café in the financial district known as the City and Kettner's champagne bar in Soho.

A few of the locations, because of their licenses, require the purchase of food along with the wine. Still, many of the higher-end places do not, including Gordon Ramsay's Union Street Café, near the Southwark Tube station.

The £10 fee also includes what Ms. Payne calls "a really fine hand-drawn map of all the venues'' by the British illustrator David Bray.


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In Transit Blog: Warhol at the Dali

Written By wartini cantika on Selasa, 27 Mei 2014 | 17.36

Devotees of Salvador Dali's fascination with the world of dreams can now examine his work and contrast it with that of Andy Warhol, whose paintings, drawings, photographs and films of the everyday are on display at the Dali Museum in St. Petersburg, Fla.

The museum's current exhibit comes entirely from the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh and includes more than 100 works. Perhaps the most striking are the photographs of painters and performers whom the artist encountered or found compelling.

The exhibit, titled "Warhol: Art. Fame. Mortality," underscores the artist's ferocious work ethic: ceaselessly drawing, photographing, making prints and filming. There is a panoply of marvelous Polaroids of the celebrities who peopled the worlds in which he moved: Warhol with Mick Jagger and Jerry Hall, Warhol with John Lennon and Yoko Ono.

There are snaps of Julian Schnabel, Francis Bacon and a winsome one of Roy Lichtenstein.

But perhaps the most powerful shot is a closeup portrait of Warhol himself, with his shock of white hair: the face so close and yet with such a faraway look.

The breadth of Warhol's work is stunning and often moving. A series of acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen images captures Jackie Kennedy as she morphs from smiling wife of President John F. Kennedy to grimly mourning widow of her murdered husband.

The exhibit also showcases Warhol's obsession with iconic American marketing images: the box of Heinz 57 ketchup, the myriad versions of the Campbell soup can.

Warhol's 16-millimeter, 54-minute silent black and white film "The Kiss" runs as part of the exhibit, which closes June 1.


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In Transit Blog: Easing the Way for East Africa Visitors

Visas have long presented a real barrier to ease of travel in many African countries. They can be pricey and require tedious forms.

And for those planning to visit multiple countries, it can mean weeks of shuffling a passport from one consulate to another — or facing longer queues at each border crossing.

Talk of visa reform is finally becoming reality in Eastern Africa. Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda have just introduced the East Africa Tourist Visa, which allows multiple entries between the three countries for a period of 90 days for $100.

"It's really a big time-saver. You can get them on arrival, but you typically have to stand in a longer line," said Dan Saperstein of Hippo Creek Safaris — not a pleasant prospect after at least a dozen hours of travel. The new visa should instead allow visitors to "arrive and relax," he said.

Mr. Saperstein said that he will be recommending the visa for clients planning trips for the summer season — say, a trek to see mountain gorillas in Rwanda, followed by a safari in Kenya. (The United States State Department recently updated its travel warning for Kenya, saying that risk in the country varies by region.)

The practice of charging relatively high fees for each border crossing was somewhat penny-wise but pound-foolish, and was believed to have had a prohibitive impact on tourism.

The new model is similar to the popular Schengen visa used in Europe.

Applications should be submitted to the consulate of the country where initial entry will be made. Single-entry visas are still available at a lesser cost for those with an itinerary for just one country.

A version of this article appears in print on 05/25/2014, on page TR3 of the NewYork edition with the headline: Easing the Way for East Africa Visitors.
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In Transit Blog: Warhol at the Dali

Written By wartini cantika on Senin, 26 Mei 2014 | 17.36

Devotees of Salvador Dali's fascination with the world of dreams can now examine his work and contrast it with that of Andy Warhol, whose paintings, drawings, photographs and films of the everyday are on display at the Dali Museum in St. Petersburg, Fla.

The museum's current exhibit comes entirely from the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh and includes more than 100 works. Perhaps the most striking are the photographs of painters and performers whom the artist encountered or found compelling.

The exhibit, titled "Warhol: Art. Fame. Mortality," underscores the artist's ferocious work ethic: ceaselessly drawing, photographing, making prints and filming. There is a panoply of marvelous Polaroids of the celebrities who peopled the worlds in which he moved: Warhol with Mick Jagger and Jerry Hall, Warhol with John Lennon and Yoko Ono.

There are snaps of Julian Schnabel, Francis Bacon and a winsome one of Roy Lichtenstein.

But perhaps the most powerful shot is a closeup portrait of Warhol himself, with his shock of white hair: the face so close and yet with such a faraway look.

The breadth of Warhol's work is stunning and often moving. A series of acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen images captures Jackie Kennedy as she morphs from smiling wife of President John F. Kennedy to grimly mourning widow of her murdered husband.

The exhibit also showcases Warhol's obsession with iconic American marketing images: the box of Heinz 57 ketchup, the myriad versions of the Campbell soup can.

Warhol's 16-millimeter, 54-minute silent black and white film "The Kiss" runs as part of the exhibit, which closes June 1.


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In Transit Blog: Easing the Way for East Africa Visitors

Visas have long presented a real barrier to ease of travel in many African countries. They can be pricey and require tedious forms.

And for those planning to visit multiple countries, it can mean weeks of shuffling a passport from one consulate to another — or facing longer queues at each border crossing.

Talk of visa reform is finally becoming reality in Eastern Africa. Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda have just introduced the East Africa Tourist Visa, which allows multiple entries between the three countries for a period of 90 days for $100.

"It's really a big time-saver. You can get them on arrival, but you typically have to stand in a longer line," said Dan Saperstein of Hippo Creek Safaris — not a pleasant prospect after at least a dozen hours of travel. The new visa should instead allow visitors to "arrive and relax," he said.

Mr. Saperstein said that he will be recommending the visa for clients planning trips for the summer season — say, a trek to see mountain gorillas in Rwanda, followed by a safari in Kenya. (The United States State Department recently updated its travel warning for Kenya, saying that risk in the country varies by region.)

The practice of charging relatively high fees for each border crossing was somewhat penny-wise but pound-foolish, and was believed to have had a prohibitive impact on tourism.

The new model is similar to the popular Schengen visa used in Europe.

Applications should be submitted to the consulate of the country where initial entry will be made. Single-entry visas are still available at a lesser cost for those with an itinerary for just one country.

A version of this article appears in print on 05/25/2014, on page TR3 of the NewYork edition with the headline: Easing the Way for East Africa Visitors.
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In Transit Blog: Warhol at the Dali

Written By wartini cantika on Minggu, 25 Mei 2014 | 17.35

Devotees of Salvador Dali's fascination with the world of dreams can now examine his work and contrast it with that of Andy Warhol, whose paintings, drawings, photographs and films of the everyday are on display at the Dali Museum in St. Petersburg, Fla.

The museum's current exhibit comes entirely from the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh and includes more than 100 works. Perhaps the most striking are the photographs of painters and performers whom the artist encountered or found compelling.

The exhibit, titled "Warhol: Art. Fame. Mortality," underscores the artist's ferocious work ethic: ceaselessly drawing, photographing, making prints and filming. There is a panoply of marvelous Polaroids of the celebrities who peopled the worlds in which he moved: Warhol with Mick Jagger and Jerry Hall, Warhol with John Lennon and Yoko Ono.

There are snaps of Julian Schnabel, Francis Bacon and a winsome one of Roy Lichtenstein.

But perhaps the most powerful shot is a closeup portrait of Warhol himself, with his shock of white hair: the face so close and yet with such a faraway look.

The breadth of Warhol's work is stunning and often moving. A series of acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen images captures Jackie Kennedy as she morphs from smiling wife of President John F. Kennedy to grimly mourning widow of her murdered husband.

The exhibit also showcases Warhol's obsession with iconic American marketing images: the box of Heinz 57 ketchup, the myriad versions of the Campbell soup can.

Warhol's 16-millimeter, 54-minute silent black and white film "The Kiss" runs as part of the exhibit, which closes June 1.


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In Transit Blog: Easing the Way for East Africa Visitors

Visas have long presented a real barrier to ease of travel in many African countries. They can be pricey and require tedious forms.

And for those planning to visit multiple countries, it can mean weeks of shuffling a passport from one consulate to another — or facing longer queues at each border crossing.

Talk of visa reform is finally becoming reality in Eastern Africa. Kenya, Rwanda and Uganda have just introduced the East Africa Tourist Visa, which allows multiple entries between the three countries for a period of 90 days for $100.

"It's really a big time-saver. You can get them on arrival, but you typically have to stand in a longer line," said Dan Saperstein of Hippo Creek Safaris — not a pleasant prospect after at least a dozen hours of travel. The new visa should instead allow visitors to "arrive and relax," he said.

Mr. Saperstein said that he will be recommending the visa for clients planning trips for the summer season — say, a trek to see mountain gorillas in Rwanda, followed by a safari in Kenya. (The United States State Department recently updated its travel warning for Kenya, saying that risk in the country varies by region.)

The practice of charging relatively high fees for each border crossing was somewhat penny-wise but pound-foolish, and was believed to have had a prohibitive impact on tourism.

The new model is similar to the popular Schengen visa used in Europe.

Applications should be submitted to the consulate of the country where initial entry will be made. Single-entry visas are still available at a lesser cost for those with an itinerary for just one country.

A version of this article appears in print on 05/25/2014, on page TR3 of the NewYork edition with the headline: Easing the Way for East Africa Visitors.
17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: Warhol at the Dali

Written By wartini cantika on Sabtu, 24 Mei 2014 | 17.35

Devotees of Salvador Dali's fascination with the world of dreams can now examine his work and contrast it with that of Andy Warhol, whose paintings, drawings, photographs and films of the everyday are on display at the Dali Museum in St. Petersburg, Fla.

The museum's current exhibit comes entirely from the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh and includes more than 100 works. Perhaps the most striking are the photographs of painters and performers whom the artist encountered or found compelling.

The exhibit, titled "Warhol: Art. Fame. Mortality," underscores the artist's ferocious work ethic: ceaselessly drawing, photographing, making prints and filming. There is a panoply of marvelous Polaroids of the celebrities who peopled the worlds in which he moved: Warhol with Mick Jagger and Jerry Hall, Warhol with John Lennon and Yoko Ono.

There are snaps of Julian Schnabel, Francis Bacon and a winsome one of Roy Lichtenstein.

But perhaps the most powerful shot is a closeup portrait of Warhol himself, with his shock of white hair: the face so close and yet with such a faraway look.

The breadth of Warhol's work is stunning and often moving. A series of acrylic and silkscreen ink on linen images captures Jackie Kennedy as she morphs from smiling wife of President John F. Kennedy to grimly mourning widow of her murdered husband.

The exhibit also showcases Warhol's obsession with iconic American marketing images: the box of Heinz 57 ketchup, the myriad versions of the Campbell soup can.

Warhol's 16-millimeter, 54-minute silent black and white film "The Kiss" runs as part of the exhibit, which closes June 1.


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In Transit Blog: Hidden Lives: Street Chef of Gulshan

Written By wartini cantika on Jumat, 23 Mei 2014 | 17.36

If our French and global food roundups didn't get your mouth watering, this might. "Street Chef of Gulshan," produced by Fred Grace and Gemma Atkinson for Fat Rat Films, is part of the Hidden Lives series that we occasionally run. It takes you on a virtual trip to Bangladesh, and explores the idea that food is a means of understanding a place and its people.

The producers wrote of the experience:

"For 16 days in Bangladesh, roti and eggs became our favorite meal. It was so simple yet mouth-wateringly delicious. We found one great source for it, a chef named Kabulsowrob, who works on the street in the Gulshan section of Dhaka. He runs a hectic, non-stop operation that requires a very repetitive routine. Day in, day out, he sets up at to the same place, gathers the same ingredients, uses the same process, sees the same customers. Yet his face was implacable, revealing no sign that he tired during the long hours that he worked. It was clear that he'd done this for ages.

In another 20 years if we return to that spot in Dhaka, we'll expect to see an old man, moving with less speed but with the same efficiency and grace as he does today."

Enjoy.


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In Transit Blog: Suite Wheels at AKA in Beverly Hills

Written By wartini cantika on Kamis, 22 Mei 2014 | 17.36

AKA, the nine-property brand of luxury extended-stay accommodations, recently introduced a mobile suite at its Beverly Hills, Calif., location in partnership with Airstream 2 Go.

The 200-square-foot suite, which is 28 feet long, is connected to a GMC Yukon Denali and is meant to be used on a five-day journey to Santa Barbara to explore the local vineyards, beaches and hiking trails.

AKA's concierge can help plan an itinerary and arrange tours and excursions. Guests park the moving hotel room at an Airstream park in the area and also have the option to spend two nights at a villa at Sunstone Vineyards near Santa Barbara.

Amenities in the suite include Frette linens and bathrobes, Bulgari bath toiletries, a Nespresso coffee machine, a sitting and dining area, a fully equipped kitchenette, a bathroom with a shower and a flat-panel TV/DVD.

It also has bikes, a gas grill and colorful accents from the California fashion designer Trina Turk such as throw pillows, coasters and an ice bucket.

AKA's president, Larry Korman, said that the to-go room is intended to offer the property's guests a fun way to see a part of the scenic California coast.

"Most of our customers stay with us between two weeks and three months, so they get the feel of living like a local, but the suite gives them a chance to have a different experience of the area," he said in a phone interview.

Prices start at $6,000 for five days and include a two-night stay at Sunstone Vineyards.


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In Transit Blog: A New Restaurant for Campobello

The Roosevelt Campobello International Park is celebrating its 50th anniversary with a new restaurant, the debut of an online reservation system for its popular "Tea with Eleanor" history series, and, later in the summer, a preview of Ken Burns's coming documentary "The Roosevelts," which examines the life of Franklin D., Eleanor and Theodore Roosevelt.

In 1964, the Roosevelt heirs deeded the 2,800 acres overlooking the Bay of Fundy in New Brunswick, Canada, to the United States and Canadian governments to preserve the 34-room Roosevelt Cottage and the grounds of the family's summer retreat.

At the cottage, visitors can view President Roosevelt's office and bedroom, the First Lady's writing room, living and dining rooms, the kitchen and nursery.

On Saturday, the Fireside Restaurant, named after F.D.R.'s fireside chats, opens as the park's first on-site restaurant, housed in a restored building that was part of the family compound. It will serve lunch daily and dinner on Friday and Saturday.

At "Tea with Eleanor," tea and homemade cookies are served while guides share insight into Eleanor Roosevelt's life on the island and narrate family artifacts and photographs. This year the seating doubles to accommodate 40 guests twice a day in the parlor of Wells-Shober Cottage.

Tickets are free on a first-come first-served basis, but can now be reserved in advance for $12. The fee includes a "Cookies for Eleanor" recipe book, a collection of the family's favorite cookie recipes.

On the park's official anniversary weekend of Aug. 7 through 10, Campobello will show a preview of "The Roosevelts." The seven-part documentary premieres on PBS on Sept. 14.

Although the park grounds are open year-round, the buildings are accessible only during the tourist season, which begins on the Saturday before Memorial Day and ends on Columbus Day. Admission is free.


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T Magazine: Accommodations | In Paris, A Sexy New Swimming Hotel Is Making Waves

The just-opened Molitor hotel is making a splash (quite literally) in Paris this season. Even in its new incarnation as a nautically themed 124-room luxury hotel, the site of the mythic Piscine Molitor — a vintage Art Deco public swimming pool — hasn't entirely lost the aura of erotic possibility that made it beloved, in a tongue-in-cheek sort of way, by generations of Parisians. The three-story cement complex with sleek ocean-liner-like architecture and two pools — one indoor and heated, one outdoor — was originally designed by the architect Lucien Pollet and inaugurated in 1929 in the heart of the silk-stocking 16th Arrondissement, Paris's Upper East Side, by the American Olympic gold medalists Aileen Wiggin and Johnny Weissmuller — who spent a summer here working as a lifeguard and giving swimming lessons before he went on to win the role of Tarzan in the film of the same name a few years later.

Intended as a place for Parisians to stay fit and cool off, the Piscine Molitor was also a backdrop against which the Parisian bourgeoisie became increasingly less corseted, both socially and sartorially. In 1946, the first modern bikini, by the designer Louis Réard, was unveiled at the pool; to the delight of local voyeurs, however, many habitués preferred to go topless. More recently, the pool, which closed in 1989 and is a listed French historical monument, had been an impromptu center for graffiti art and an occasional venue for rave parties and fashion shoots.

The city of Paris invited bids for a renovation of the pool in 2007, and the French hotel company Accor, working with several partners, was awarded the contract to renovate and redevelop the badly dilapidated structure. Scrupulous attention was paid to restoring the pools' original Art Deco mosaic walls and charming stained-glass windows, and the project cost more than 80 million euros.

Most rooms at the Molitor are located in a two-story annex built on top of the original swimming-pool complex, and the best ones come with terraces looking out over Paris or the pool. Designed by Jean-Philippe Nuel, they're done up in schemes of white, black and gray with sleek Art Deco-inspired contemporary furniture, and come with Bose sound systems and espresso makers. In addition to the pools, other amenities include a rooftop terrace with spectacular views of Paris, a Clarins spa and a restaurant supervised by the chef Yannick Alleno, formerly at the Hotel Le Meurice. The Molitor offers an ideal location for anyone attending the French Open tennis matches at Roland Garros, just a 10-minute walk away; the atelier and apartment of the architect Le Corbusier just down the street shouldn't be missed either.

In deference to the somewhat delicate question of public access to what had once been a municipal recreational facility, schoolchildren from neighboring institutions will be invited to use the pools, but otherwise entry for the general public comes at a stiff 150-180 euros per day. An annual membership — only one thousand of which will be released — costs 1,200 euros upon joining and 3,300 euros in annual dues.

Not surprisingly, these fees have caused some ripples, with the former French cultural minister Jacques Lang — who had the Piscine Molitor listed as an historic monument while in office — denouncing the commercialization of the pool, and other Parisian politicians calling for greater public access. What no one would argue, however, is that the Molitor is as sexy a place to get wet as ever before — and one of the most original new places in which to spend a night that the city has seen in a long time.

2 Avenue de la Porte Molitor, 16th Arrondissement, Paris, +33-1-56-07-08-50, mltr.fr. Doubles from 270 euros.


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In Transit Blog: On Tap in Paris: Beer Week

Written By wartini cantika on Rabu, 21 Mei 2014 | 17.36

The first ever Paris Beer Week (Saturday through June 1) will showcase the increasing number of French brewers who wield hops with panache.

At the moment, craft beer is a niche scene in Paris, as wine obviously has the upper hand.

Paris Beer Week's aim is to have drinkers offer the beverage the same consideration — attention to aromatic nuance, respect for savoir faire — so readily accorded to wine.

The week, peppered with tastings and events at 15 locations throughout Paris, plus five in the greater Île-de-France region, ends with a daylong celebration in the city.

The event was created and coordinated by Romain Lebel, who until recently worked as a software engineer.

Mr. Lebel was savvy about wine, but began seeing more interest in beer. It happened that his neighbor in Bagnolet, an eastern suburb of Paris, was Brasserie Outland, an artisanal brewery.

As his interest in craft beer grew, he wanted the word to spread beyond the small but avid community of connoisseurs.

Mr. Lebel said he sees craft beer as a return to something time-honored — "similar to what has happened with natural wine or the revival of the traditional baguette," he said. "Beer too is a fundamental: malted grains, fermented with water. It exists everywhere in the world."

Mr. Lebel was eager to integrate the movements happening abroad, from Belgium to Brooklyn, into his native city. "There isn't a brewing tradition in France, except in Alsace and Brittany," he said. "The people who started their breweries here had a revelation elsewhere."

The spirit of Paris Beer Week was about creating, as Mr. Lebel put it, "a regional manifestation of something more global."


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In Transit Blog: Ian Fleming’s Villa, by the Room

The Fleming Villa, a three-bedroom home in Oracabessa on Jamaica's north coast where Ian Fleming wrote his James Bond novels, is usually available to rent only  in its entirety, but starting on May 28 –  the day that would have been the author's 106th birthday — travelers will be able to rent a single bedroom.

The 7,500-square-foot space is part of Goldeneye, a resort owned by the Island Records founder Chris Blackwell, and is set among 15 acres of grounds overlooking the ocean, which have almond trees planted by Mr. Fleming.

Highlights of the retreat include a private beach, a pool, a large media room with a 64-inch flat-screen television, an indoor/outdoor sound system, a full staff with a butler, cook and housekeeper, and memorabilia throughout, including the author's original writing desk, pictures of Mr. Fleming with various celebrities and bound editions of his books.

Each bedroom has handmade 400-thread-count sheets on the beds and spacious bathrooms with outdoor soaking tubs and showers.

The single room option is available through Dec. 15 with some blackout dates, and prices start at $2,500 a night.


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In Transit Blog: Walkabout: Airlines’ Sticker Prices; Ryanair Competition

Written By wartini cantika on Selasa, 20 Mei 2014 | 17.35

The Real Deal Should an airline be required to tell you the full price of a ticket before you purchase it? Or should it be able to advertise only its base fares? Two bills in Congress offer different answers. (Bloomberg View)

How Low Can You Go? Ryanair, Europe's largest carrier, sees its profits drop, as the region's flagging economy and high unemployment drive more rival carriers into the race for cost-conscious travelers. (The New York Times)

A Lot of Pedaling Ahead A well-informed look at who is biking to work, both here and abroad. Numbers in the United States are up, but foreign cities, particularly in Northern Europe, are way ahead. (Vox.com)

Where to Get Your Pac-Man Fix Remember when gamers actually left their houses? A visit to the place that bills itself as the country's largest video arcade recalls that era, and the vintage games we used to play. (Ars Technica)


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In Transit Blog: At Ozarks Lodge, Natural History (and Golf)

Big Cedar Lodge in the Ozark Mountains in Missouri, will introduce a recreational and cultural complex called Top of the Rock in June that will feature a natural history museum, several restaurants, spa, golf courses and even a chapel.

With clear views of the mountains and Table Rock Lake, Top of the Rock is accessible from the main resort by a 2.5-mile nature trail; guests may use resort-provided electric carts.

The formal entrance to the 462-acre extension starts at the four-story Lost Canyon Cave, a natural formation accessorized with an elevator, waterfall, several balconies and a cave bar. Those athletically inclined can tee off at the cliff-top, three-part golf course designed by Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer and Tom Watson.

An Ozarks natural history museum showcases carbon-dated skeletons of a Missouri mammoth, cave lion, and a ground sloth in the lobby (an entrance fee applies). Dioramas of prehistoric creatures that once roamed the area can be viewed on the lower level, as well as Native American and Osage Indian artifacts.

There is also a varied dining scene: Arnie's Barn — a casual Mexican restaurant — is a reconstructed wooden barn that was disassembled by hand in the Pennsylvania hometown of Mr. Palmer. The Osage restaurant features American-style cuisine, an all-American wine cellar as well as whiskey and cigar and Cognac rooms.

There is also a gothic-style wedding chapel with steeple bell tower, and a honeymoon cabin graces one edge of the extension. European-style treatments will be offered at the full-service Cedar Creek Spa, which has a stone-walled indoor grotto pool.

"Top of the Rock is the highest point in the county, and I have a lot of emotional and personal attachment to the area," John Morris, founder of Bass Pro Shops and owner of the resort, said in a telephone interview. "It is exciting to showcase our part of the world and connect people to nature and to our past," he said.

All of these upgrades won't mean steeper lodging rates at the original 246-room resort, where prices start from $179.


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In Transit Blog: A Las Vegas Boutique Hotel With Star Power

Written By wartini cantika on Senin, 19 Mei 2014 | 17.35

In a market defined by size, the Cromwell checks into Las Vegas this month as the underdog, competing on style rather than scale.

Apart from the Strip's early days of modest motel resorts, the 188-room newcomer, officially opening Memorial Day weekend, is the Strip's first stand-alone boutique hotel.

It's got the requisite lobby casino with 40,000 square feet of gaming, but guests will note the intimate, library-evoking check-in desk next to the porte-cochere, a novelty among hotels here where reception areas generally feature velvet ropes to corral the crowds.

Upstairs, guest rooms feature vintage details like distressed hardwood floors, old-fashioned luggage turned into dressers and showgirl-style lighting around vanity mirrors. Housekeeping will replenish complimentary coffee, tea and refreshments on each floor throughout the day.

The hotel will have two unique entertainment features open to the paying public: Giada, the first restaurant from the Food Network chef Giada De Laurentiis, and the rooftop club Drai's. Giada will feature housemade pasta, an antipasti bar and prime views of the Bellagio fountains across the street through floor-to-ceiling windows.

On the 11th story rooftop, Drai's, open as a pool club during the day and a nightclub in the evenings, will expand the frame of view to take in the entire neon thoroughfare.

Rooms start at $249.


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In Transit Blog: Making Room for Low Cost and High Style

On the heels of hotels like Yotel and Aloft, a crop of new brands is designed for millennial travelers.

Marriott International recently announced that it would open Moxy Hotels this summer, a high-style, value-priced chain featuring relatively small rooms — about 170 square feet — with wall-size art and large windows that provide a sense of space. To balance these, public spaces are generous, designed as social settings for work and play, with ample outlets for charging mobile devices and free Wi-Fi. A lounge will offer continental breakfast in the morning and local beer and wine in the evening, with a 24-hour market for snacks to go.

The first Moxy will open at Milan's Malpensa Airport in August, with another five scheduled to open in Europe through 2015. For now, Moxys will only be in Europe.

"When evaluating the economy tier in Europe, we found a lot of independent hotels, and what was available was dull and uninspiring," said Tina Edmundson, Marriott International's global brand officer for luxury and lifestyle brands.

Meanwile, international outlets are coming to the United States. The Amsterdam-based citizenM opened a 230-room Times Square location in April, featuring functional rooms with digital art and tablet computers, and a convivial lobby where guests check themselves in. Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group plans to start Radisson Red in capitals worldwide in 2015, with a goal of 60 by 2020. Guests will check in, order food and adjust room temperature with a mobile app.

In addition to style and high-tech functionality, the newcomers share relatively inexpensive prices, with many rooms going for about $200 or less, depending on location. Referring to Moxy, Ms. Edmundson noted: "This brand is designed for value-conscious travelers, which is not to say that all millennials are value conscious. But people in their 20s tend to be more cost conscious."

A version of this article appears in print on 05/18/2014, on page TR3 of the NewYork edition with the headline: Making Room for Low Cost and High Style.

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In Transit Blog: A Las Vegas Boutique Hotel With Star Power

Written By wartini cantika on Minggu, 18 Mei 2014 | 17.35

In a market defined by size, the Cromwell checks into Las Vegas this month as the underdog, competing on style rather than scale.

Apart from the Strip's early days of modest motel resorts, the 188-room newcomer, officially opening Memorial Day weekend, is the Strip's first stand-alone boutique hotel.

It's got the requisite lobby casino with 40,000 square feet of gaming, but guests will note the intimate, library-evoking check-in desk next to the porte-cochere, a novelty among hotels here where reception areas generally feature velvet ropes to corral the crowds.

Upstairs, guest rooms feature vintage details like distressed hardwood floors, old-fashioned luggage turned into dressers and showgirl-style lighting around vanity mirrors. Housekeeping will replenish complimentary coffee, tea and refreshments on each floor throughout the day.

The hotel will have two unique entertainment features open to the paying public: Giada, the first restaurant from the Food Network chef Giada De Laurentiis, and the rooftop club Drai's. Giada will feature housemade pasta, an antipasti bar and prime views of the Bellagio fountains across the street through floor-to-ceiling windows.

On the 11th story rooftop, Drai's, open as a pool club during the day and a nightclub in the evenings, will expand the frame of view to take in the entire neon thoroughfare.

Rooms start at $249.


17.35 | 0 komentar | Read More

In Transit Blog: Making Room for Low Cost and High Style

On the heels of hotels like Yotel and Aloft, a crop of new brands is designed for millennial travelers.

Marriott International recently announced that it would open Moxy Hotels this summer, a high-style, value-priced chain featuring relatively small rooms — about 170 square feet — with wall-size art and large windows that provide a sense of space. To balance these, public spaces are generous, designed as social settings for work and play, with ample outlets for charging mobile devices and free Wi-Fi. A lounge will offer continental breakfast in the morning and local beer and wine in the evening, with a 24-hour market for snacks to go.

The first Moxy will open at Milan's Malpensa Airport in August, with another five scheduled to open in Europe through 2015. For now, Moxys will only be in Europe.

"When evaluating the economy tier in Europe, we found a lot of independent hotels, and what was available was dull and uninspiring," said Tina Edmundson, Marriott International's global brand officer for luxury and lifestyle brands.

Meanwile, international outlets are coming to the United States. The Amsterdam-based citizenM opened a 230-room Times Square location in April, featuring functional rooms with digital art and tablet computers, and a convivial lobby where guests check themselves in. Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group plans to start Radisson Red in capitals worldwide in 2015, with a goal of 60 by 2020. Guests will check in, order food and adjust room temperature with a mobile app.

In addition to style and high-tech functionality, the newcomers share relatively inexpensive prices, with many rooms going for about $200 or less, depending on location. Referring to Moxy, Ms. Edmundson noted: "This brand is designed for value-conscious travelers, which is not to say that all millennials are value conscious. But people in their 20s tend to be more cost conscious."

A version of this article appears in print on 05/18/2014, on page TR3 of the NewYork edition with the headline: Making Room for Low Cost and High Style.

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In Transit Blog: A Las Vegas Boutique Hotel With Star Power

Written By wartini cantika on Sabtu, 17 Mei 2014 | 17.35

In a market defined by size, the Cromwell checks into Las Vegas this month as the underdog, competing on style rather than scale.

Apart from the Strip's early days of modest motel resorts, the 188-room newcomer, officially opening Memorial Day weekend, is the Strip's first stand-alone boutique hotel.

It's got the requisite lobby casino with 40,000 square feet of gaming, but guests will note the intimate, library-evoking check-in desk next to the porte-cochere, a novelty among hotels here where reception areas generally feature velvet ropes to corral the crowds.

Upstairs, guest rooms feature vintage details like distressed hardwood floors, old-fashioned luggage turned into dressers and showgirl-style lighting around vanity mirrors. Housekeeping will replenish complimentary coffee, tea and refreshments on each floor throughout the day.

The hotel will have two unique entertainment features open to the paying public: Giada, the first restaurant from the Food Network chef Giada De Laurentiis, and the rooftop club Drai's. Giada will feature housemade pasta, an antipasti bar and prime views of the Bellagio fountains across the street through floor-to-ceiling windows.

On the 11th story rooftop, Drai's, open as a pool club during the day and a nightclub in the evenings, will expand the frame of view to take in the entire neon thoroughfare.

Rooms start at $249.


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In Transit Blog: Now on Hotel Lists: Private-Label Wines

Written By wartini cantika on Jumat, 16 Mei 2014 | 17.36

Guests can order wine just about anywhere they stay, but now they can swirl something a bit more exclusive in their glass: A number of hotels are offering private label vintages as a way to increase cachet and enhance the local dining experience.

The Peninsula Hong Kong introduced its own Shaoxing Hua Diao, a 15-year aged Chinese wine made with fermented rice, in late 2013. The group also offers Champagne brut (by Deutz), pinot noir and chardonnay (both by Keller Estate) at all of its properties, served in dark bottles with the hotel's logo inked on labels.

The Ojai Valley Inn & Spa,  north of Los Angeles, offers a "Pink Moment" sparkling rosé in honor of the area's sunsets.

Some, like Argos in Cappadocia, Turkey, offer local varietals like the Kalecik karasi (a grape similar to pinot noir) from its 35-acre vineyards.

Among the more than 6,000 vintages at Sabi Sabi Private Game Reserve in South Africa is a 2012 pinotage house wine that matures on site in barrels sent from the nearby Stellenbosch winery.

Others will showcase annual vintages: Capella Pedregal in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, plans to offer the "Capella Unique Collection" portfolio of private wines over the next few years; the first made its debut last month.

Because many visitors purchase wine with a meal, the Four Seasons offers branded wines in some of its restaurants, like the "Cielo" pinot noir in St. Louis and a "One Forty" cabernet sauvignon at the company's Lanai restaurant (the name comes from the number of square miles on Lanai).

Kathy LaTour, associate professor of services marketing at Cornell School of Hotel Administration, said that wine is an important part of the hotel experience. "As millennials travel more, they're reflecting on their hotel experience by bringing back a bottle of wine," she said.


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In Transit Blog: New Yoga Programs at Six Senses Resorts

Those looking to travel to a deeper state of consciousness on their next vacation might consider one of Six Senses' new yoga-based retreats.

The hotel, resort and spa company recently announced three intensive programs aimed at teaching guests how to strengthen and balance the mind and body through one-on-one daily yoga, meditation and deep breathing sessions conducted by professional in-house yoga masters and complemented by massages, cleanses, facials and other holistic practices.

Novices should begin with the Discover Yoga program, which uses a daily practice of hatha yoga, guided meditation and pranayama, or deep breathing, exercises to introduce the guest to the idea of calming and balancing the mind and body.

Yogic Detox, aimed at experienced practitioners, combines aspects of asana — hatha postures — with cleansing processes like antirheumatic joint movement exercises, intestinal washes with lukewarm salt water and saline rinses through the sinus cavity, along with less invasive methods, like forceful breath exhalation and candle flame meditation.

And for the restless traveler, the Yogic Sleep program, which will be introduced later this year, will be centered around yoga nidra, an ancient practice that brings the mind to a state of meditative consciousness in order to address psychological, neurological and subconscious tensions.

"On the physical level, we are constantly exposed to a polluted environment which can have an adverse impact on our bodies as we absorb various toxins through air, water and the food we eat. On the mental level, our daily fears, stress and anxiety affect the subconscious mind," Dorelal Singh, an experienced yoga practitioner and teacher who is guiding the programs' launch, said in an email.

"Yoga is the only science which has provided a well-rounded means to assist us in dealing with these physical and mental pressures," he said.

A variety of massages, body scrubs and energy treatments, like chakra healing and Reiki, are also scheduled throughout the retreat to assist with relaxation and rejuvenation. Guests will be served healthy meals sourced from on-site gardens and local markets, and minibars in each room will be customized for Detox participants, replacing the usual caffeinated beverages and chips with snacks like coconut water and fresh fruit.

Discover and Detox retreats, which can be booked for  three to 21 days, are currently being offered at all Six Senses resorts, including Zighy Bay in Oman, Laamu in the Maldives, Ninh Van Bay and Con Dao in Vietnam and Yao Noi and Ko Samui, in Thailand, starting at $210 per person for three nights, not including accommodations.

Retreats are also available at partner spas in Greece, Portugal, the Dominican Republic, India and Kuwait.


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In Transit Blog: Latest Airplane Amenity: An Apartment

Written By wartini cantika on Kamis, 15 Mei 2014 | 17.35

The airline that introduced the Flying Nanny for traveling families just announced more residentially inspired amenities, including a one-bedroom apartment in the air.

Beginning in December, Etihad Airways will introduce the Residence by Etihad, a new upper-deck cabin that outclasses first class with a private suite including a bedroom, living room and bathroom with a shower, plus the services of a personal butler.

The new cabin, designed for one or two passengers, will be added to five new Airbus A380 aircraft the airline has ordered.

The first will be appear in December, followed by the second in the first quarter of 2015. Both will operate on the Abu Dhabi-London route, with fares for the Residence currently quoted at $21,000.

Another three planes will begin flying later in 2015, potentially on routes between Abu Dhabi and Kennedy Airport as well as Abu Dhabi and Sydney.

In addition, Etihad will add nine First Apartments to each A380, which will feature a reclining armchair and full-length ottoman that converts into an 80-inch bed, all concealed behind a sliding door. Guests of these quarters will have access to a shared shower room.

In lieu of armrest exchanges, anyone in first or business classes who wants to socialize with fellow passengers can do so in the Lobby, a full-service lounge with semi-circular sofas and a large-screen TV.

While many airlines have added elaborate features to their forward-class cabins, don't expect competitors to follow suit with their own private-jet-style apartments like those offered by Etihad, which is funded by the oil-rich Abu Dhabi government.

"Etihad is in a category not all their own but one not occupied by too many airlines, where they can do something like this with less risk because they are very well-funded," said Seth Kaplan, managing partner of Airline Weekly, which covers the industry. "Is it to meet market demand? Well, maybe. But if they got their math wrong, it's not as much of a big deal as it would be at United or American."


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In Transit Blog: The Best Time to Book July 4 Trips

July 4 falls on a Friday this year, giving many a three-day holiday and time to travel. To get the best deal on Independence Day airfares in a potentially crowded season, the travel-planning website Hipmunk advises making plans by the end of May.

Using data from 2013 ticket sales on its site, Hipmunk analysts found that those who booked flights for July 4 holiday travel during the week beginning on Memorial Day (May 27 last year) spent an average of $417 on a round-trip ticket, versus those who booked three weeks later and spent $547.

Based on this data, the company recommends fliers buy tickets between May 26 and June 1 this year to save more than $100 each.

Most analysts agree airfares tend to rise steadily within 30 days of departure. Hipmunk highlights other benefits of thinking ahead.

"Travelers who book early will not only save money on average, but also get the most convenient flight times and avoid unnecessary layovers for a less agonizing trip," Adam Goldstein, co-founder and chief executive of Hipmunk, said in a press release.


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In Transit Blog: A Plush Bike Trip in Tennessee

Written By wartini cantika on Rabu, 14 Mei 2014 | 17.35

Trek Travel has partnered with Blackberry Farm, a Relais & Châteaux property in eastern Tennessee, to host the Great Smoky Mountains/Blackberry Farm Bike Tour in November.

The six-day, five-night cycling vacation in the southern Appalachians includes menus of farm-fresh, local cuisine.

Guests will also  be given private garden tours led by Blackberry Farm's chef, a cooking class and an exclusive tour and beer tasting with the estate's brewmaster.

When not indulging in all things culinary, travelers will bicycle along quiet country roads, including the Foothills Parkway and the Cades Cove Loop, known for its autumnal scenery.

Other outdoor activities include a canoe, kayak or paddleboard outing on Chilhowee Lake and an evening with a southern Appalachian historian around a campfire on the banks of Hesse Creek.

Along with luxurious accommodations, the pampering continues with a private yoga class and a farewell massage.

The tour, beginning and ending in Knoxville, will be offered the week of Nov. 16 and priced at $5,499 per person. Trek Travel tours include guides and professional level bikes equipped with cycling-specific G.P.S. devices.


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In Transit Blog: Latest Airplane Amenity: An Apartment

The airline that introduced the Flying Nanny for traveling families just announced more residentially inspired amenities, including a one-bedroom apartment in the air.

Beginning in December, Etihad Airways will introduce the Residence by Etihad, a new upper-deck cabin that outclasses first class with a private suite including a bedroom, living room and bathroom with a shower, plus the services of a personal butler.

The new cabin, designed for one or two passengers, will be added to five new Airbus A380 aircraft the airline has ordered.

The first will be appear in December, followed by the second in the first quarter of 2015. Both will operate on the Abu Dhabi-London route, with fares for the Residence currently quoted at $21,000.

Another three planes will begin flying later in 2015, potentially on routes between Abu Dhabi and Kennedy Airport as well as Abu Dhabi and Sydney.

In addition, Etihad will add nine First Apartments to each A380, which will feature a reclining armchair and full-length ottoman that converts into an 80-inch bed, all concealed behind a sliding door. Guests of these quarters will have access to a shared shower room.

In lieu of armrest exchanges, anyone in first or business classes who wants to socialize with fellow passengers can do so in the Lobby, a full-service lounge with semi-circular sofas and a large-screen TV.

While many airlines have added elaborate features to their forward-class cabins, don't expect competitors to follow suit with their own private-jet-style apartments like those offered by Etihad, which is funded by the oil-rich Abu Dhabi government.

"Etihad is in a category not all their own but one not occupied by too many airlines, where they can do something like this with less risk because they are very well-funded," said Seth Kaplan, managing partner of Airline Weekly, which covers the industry. "Is it to meet market demand? Well, maybe. But if they got their math wrong, it's not as much of a big deal as it would be at United or American."


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In Transit Blog: Orient Express, the Lifestyle Brand

Written By wartini cantika on Selasa, 13 Mei 2014 | 17.36

Orient Express, the luxurious French train company made famous in the late 19th and early 20th centuries by passengers like the Mata Hari and, later, immortalized by novelists like Agatha Christie, is being revived, though not to offer rail service, at least not at first.

S.N.C.F., the state rail company of France, has planned a relaunch of the brand, which it has owned since 1977, beginning with a series of merchandising partnerships to create a line of upscale travel products, which so far include luggage by Moynat, beds and bedding by Cauval's Treca Interiors and specialty teas blended by Dammann Frères.

"We want to develop a brand that has luxury travel and French lifestyle at its center," Frank Bernard, the brand's managing director told The Financial Times in January.

The initiative is S.N.C.F.'s first commercial venture with the brand since it granted the Orient Express Hotels Group license to use the name in 2001. (The two companies recently ended their licensing agreement and the hotel group rebranded itself under the name Belmond. Belmond's Venice Simplon-Orient-Express rail service is a completely separate venture.)

More partnerships are in development, but resurrecting that glamorous leisure train service may take a while. And although Mr. Bernard said that service between Paris and Vienna was likely to begin within the next five years, the company said that no schedule or route had been determined at this point.

The one thing certain? If service does resume, it will be in cars designed in contemporary style, with luxurious modern amenities, "a cruise train," as the company described it in a press release, "envisioned as a place where one can fully savor the sweeping landscapes, free of time's constraints, in a contemporary setting that embodies French savoir-faire and consummately civilized hospitality."

The first Orient Express took passengers from Paris to Bucharest, beginning in 1883. Later, in 1889, the route expanded to include a direct line to Constantinople, which is now Istanbul. But the popularity of low-cost airlines and high-speed trains in the last decades forced the company to shrink its service in the 1970s and end it completely in 2009.

In the meantime, travelers can get a look at the train's former glory at "The Orient Express: Once Upon a Time," an exhibition sponsored by S.N.C.F. and the Arab World Institute in Paris, where it is on view through August. Susanne Fowler has a report on that here.


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T Magazine: Now Online | Summer Travel Issue

Whether it's the design of a hotel suite, the search for a perfect pair of swim trunks or the everyday act of getting around on foot, T's summer travel issue highlights the power of simplicity. We start in Todos Santos, Mexico, a laid-back surf town whose hippie vibes and reliable waves make it easy to pack light — a bathing suit and a few summertime knits should do. We visit India, where the bohemian designer Loulou Van Damme has channeled her effortless style into a guesthouse in the scenic Palani Hills. And in New York City, we step inside the Greenwich Hotel, where the renowned Belgian antiques dealer Axel Vervoordt has introduced modest luxury by way of a three-story penthouse created in his own wabi-sabi aesthetic. Elsewhere, the ladies of the Ferragamo dynasty line up for a special multigenerational portrait; the MoMA PS1 director Klaus Biesenbach parties with friends in Rockaway, Queens, where he's become the community's loudest champion; our critic at large Andrew O'Hagan writes about the transformative power of swimming while searching for the holy grail of trunks; and a trio of artists make time to break bread with their staffs. See all stories from the issue >>


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In Transit Blog: Orient Express, the Exhibition

The towering brunette beauty in shiny spike heels and her short, gray-haired companion waited in line at dusk in the French capital one recent Friday as tourists in jeans and hoodies stared in envy.

For far less than the price of a rail ticket to Istanbul, the eye-catching couple was about to step back in time by sampling lobster, morels and rosewater-lokum ice cream aboard a restored Orient Express dining car in the courtyard of the Institute of the Arab World in Paris's Fifth Arrondissement.

The pop-up restaurant, directed by the Michelin-starred Yannick Alléno is just one element of a clever new exhibition that runs through August on how the fabled train opened regions east of Europe to more than just the most intrepid travelers.

Visitors to ''Once Upon a Time the Orient Express'' first encounter a hulking black locomotive on the museum grounds, and then stroll through authentic carriages — a lounge, a sleeper and a bar car — to imagine how it felt as the Art Deco icon trundled across border after border, bringing the rich and famous to explore what they viewed as exotic cultures.

Recordings of muffled conversations, and even sneezes and snores, echo overhead as you pass through the cars, designed to shudder as if still on the rails.

Walls of the lounge are decorated with stylized bas relief nudes of René Lalique crystal. On one table sits a manual Remington typewriter next to a copy of  ''Stamboul Train,'' Graham Greene's tale of romance, death and espionage as the train hurtled toward Constantinople.

Another table features Josephine Baker playbills, a string of pearls, kid leather gloves, a Bakelite cigarette holder and champagne flutes. On yet another, a red fez and a crystal hookah represent the French author and explorer Pierre Loti.

Sleeper cars pay homage to fictional characters like James Bond and celebrated passengers like Mata Hari.

In the Train Bleu bar car, all mahogany and leather, a lamp with a delicately fluted shade illuminates a table set with a brandy decanter and copies of Agatha Christie's ''Murder on the Orient Express'' in French, Turkish and Hungarian.

Claude Mollard, a longtime arts adviser known for his role in establishing the Georges Pompidou Center, curated the exhibition in a $3.5 million collaboration with the French National Railway Company, known by its French acronym SNCF, which has owned the Orient Express brand name since 1977.

Mr. Mollard continues the exhibition inside the museum, detailing the train's ties to Turkey and the Arab world with an installation of newsreels, oil paintings, travel posters and dinnerware, some displayed in cases modeled on supersize travel trunks.

With the detail and humor that has been injected into the exhibition, it's clear that the curator understood what Proust meant by ''the most intoxicating of romance novels, the railway timetable.''

And for those who can't quite part with 120 euros, or $165, for four courses (160 euros with wine) to dine in Mr. Alléno's Ephemeral Orient Express Restaurant, the exhibition ends with an Arabic-style coffee shop.


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In Transit Blog: A Flurry of Bookings to Norway

Whether because of Disney's animated Oscar-winner "Frozen" or interest in climatologically threatened polar bears, travel to Norway has increased this year.

The airport at Oslo reported a 57 percent jump in American arrivals from New York in the first quarter alone. And the prospect of summer, with warmer weather and family vacations, promises more arrivals.

Several United States-based tour operators have reported growth in bookings ranging from 20 percent to 34 percent. The demand led California-based Wilderness Travel to increase its Norway trips to five this year from one, with over 90 percent of spaces already sold; seven trips will be offered in 2015.

The Disney tour company Adventures by Disney, seeking to capitalize on the film, introduced an eight-day Norway trip with seven departures this summer and fall.

The trips begin in Bergen, purportedly the model for Arendelle, the setting for "Frozen," and visit stave churches, fjords and folk dancers, also sources of inspiration for the filmmakers. Next summer, Disney Cruise Line will begin seven-, nine- and 11-night sailings around the Norwegian coast.

In June, Natural Habitat Adventures will run a new small-ship-based Iceland-to-Norway trip focused on seeing polar bears and other Arctic species. Ted Martens, marketing and sustainability director for the Boulder, Colo.-based company, said Arctic programs in general had experienced substantial growth apart from the movie's popularity.

"I think people are realizing there are some incredible experiences to be had near the poles, and they don't need to go all the way to Antarctica to see glaciers, icebergs and unique wildlife," he said in an email.


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T Magazine: In the Air | Tribal Beauty

Written By wartini cantika on Senin, 12 Mei 2014 | 17.35

The glories of African design, from vibrant patterned prints to regal embellishment, are yet again influencing the arts.

In our video, Charlotte di Carcaci discusses how African prints, beadwork and culture have become a source of inspiration for today's fashion.

Fashion is once again tapping the great African continent for inspiration, from Givenchy's mosaic-print jersey dress (left) to the geometric tapestry on a new Burberry Prorsum bag (bottom right). In the 1970s, the Somali supermodel Iman was photographed for Vogue in resplendent attire (center left). Her regal pose is echoed in Jean Dunand's 1926 portrait of the French milliner Madame Agnès (center right), draped in patterns reminiscent of the beadwork worn by women of the Samburu tribe in northern Kenya (top right).

The art of body painting, seen on the face of a child from Ethiopia's Omo Valley (left) and in the Ghanaian artist Owusu-Ankomah's 1992 painting "Jumping Jack" (bottom right), is a sacred means of expression within many African tribes. While the paint is thought by some to ward off supernatural danger, embellishments like cowrie shells, often worn as jewelry, are also used by West African priests in divination rituals. Decoration and color contrast, both of which are deeply rooted in tribal traditions, have been appropriated by way of Alexander McQueen's beaded cutaway dress (center) and Dries Van Noten's heeled sandal (top right).

The dizzying prints found in Edun's revamped line (left) were the height of fashion back in the 1920s, when Man Ray photographed the British heiress and writer Nancy Cunard in a daring look accented by bracelets stacked in the African style (top right). In the village of Tiébélé in Burkina Faso in West Africa, women decorate the facades of their homes with strikingly similar black and white motifs (top center), versions of which were borrowed for Diane von Furstenberg's spring collection (center right), a ceramic vase from Creatures of Comfort (bottom center) and a woven basket by Design Afrika (bottom right).

Repeating geometry, often a signature of African design, is seen in prints for Duro Olowu's fall collection (left), a sable tureen sculpted by the South African artist Sabelo Khoza and painted by Virginia Xaba (bottom center) and the ceiling of the contemporary architect David Adjaye's Asymmetric Chamber pavilion in Liverpool (bottom right). Complementary angular dimensions can be found in Pierre Legrain's Chaise Africaine from the 1920s (top right) and, more recently, in Donna Karan's leather pendant necklace (top center).


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T Magazine: Editor’s Letter | Simple Pleasures

This issue might seem to have little to do with style: walking in nature, swimming in the ocean, eating supper under the stars or setting out to a distant locale.

But while some of our stories celebrate rarefied places and exquisite experiences, the message behind all of them is one of artful simplicity. Take, for example, the radically pared-down, three-bedroom penthouse suite the Belgian designer Axel Vervoordt and the Japanese-born architect Tatsuro Miki created atop the Greenwich Hotel in New York City. Vervoordt spent four years creating a humble, rustic abode inspired by the Japanese concept of wabi-sabi. His intention is for people to see the beauty in raw and aged materials as a reminder of the transience and imperfection of all things. (These lessons come to you courtesy of T, even if the suite goes for $15,000 per night.)

Our critic at large, Andrew O'Hagan, muses on swimming as a transformative state, one that conjures memories of childhood and the refreshing sense of losing oneself in water — and on the difficulty of finding the right pair of swim trunks. Liesl Schillinger praises the meditative joys of walking, and how forging our own path imprints a lasting place and time in our minds.

Style resides in how we think and feel and go about our lives, but small touches are also important: a chic, dangly pair of earrings worn with hair slicked back after a swim, a bathing suit that makes you feel worthy of the sea or an elegant table set with flowers from the garden.

People often ask where our stories come from. This month, a writer new to T, Michael Snyder, proposed a profile of a Belgian woman we'd never heard of who was building a small hotel — guesthouse, really — near the remote South Indian mountains of her birthplace. We took one look at Simon Roberts's snapshots of Loulou Van Damme — her beautiful, lined face; gray hair wrapped in a scarf; loose, authentically bohemian clothing; and piles of jewelry — and fell in love. We could all feel immediately the force of the life that had created her fantastic style and captured our imaginations.


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T Magazine: Now Online | Summer Travel Issue

Whether it's the design of a hotel suite, the search for a perfect pair of swim trunks or the everyday act of getting around on foot, T's summer travel issue highlights the power of simplicity. We start in Todos Santos, Mexico, a laid-back surf town whose hippie vibes and reliable waves make it easy to pack light — a bathing suit and a few summertime knits should do. We visit India, where the bohemian designer Loulou Van Damme has channeled her effortless style into a guesthouse in the scenic Palani Hills. And in New York City, we step inside the Greenwich Hotel, where the renowned Belgian antiques dealer Axel Vervoordt has introduced modest luxury by way of a three-story penthouse created in his own wabi-sabi aesthetic. Elsewhere, the ladies of the Ferragamo dynasty line up for a special multigenerational portrait; the MoMA PS1 director Klaus Biesenbach parties with friends in Rockaway, Queens, where he's become the community's loudest champion; our critic at large Andrew O'Hagan writes about the transformative power of swimming while searching for the holy grail of trunks; and a trio of artists make time to break bread with their staffs. See all stories from the issue >>


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T Magazine: Editor’s Letter | Simple Pleasures

Written By wartini cantika on Minggu, 11 Mei 2014 | 17.35

This issue might seem to have little to do with style: walking in nature, swimming in the ocean, eating supper under the stars or setting out to a distant locale.

But while some of our stories celebrate rarefied places and exquisite experiences, the message behind all of them is one of artful simplicity. Take, for example, the radically pared-down, three-bedroom penthouse suite the Belgian designer Axel Vervoordt and the Japanese-born architect Tatsuro Miki created atop the Greenwich Hotel in New York City. Vervoordt spent four years creating a humble, rustic abode inspired by the Japanese concept of wabi-sabi. His intention is for people to see the beauty in raw and aged materials as a reminder of the transience and imperfection of all things. (These lessons come to you courtesy of T, even if the suite goes for $15,000 per night.)

Our critic at large, Andrew O'Hagan, muses on swimming as a transformative state, one that conjures memories of childhood and the refreshing sense of losing oneself in water — and on the difficulty of finding the right pair of swim trunks. Liesl Schillinger praises the meditative joys of walking, and how forging our own path imprints a lasting place and time in our minds.

Style resides in how we think and feel and go about our lives, but small touches are also important: a chic, dangly pair of earrings worn with hair slicked back after a swim, a bathing suit that makes you feel worthy of the sea or an elegant table set with flowers from the garden.

People often ask where our stories come from. This month, a writer new to T, Michael Snyder, proposed a profile of a Belgian woman we'd never heard of who was building a small hotel — guesthouse, really — near the remote South Indian mountains of her birthplace. We took one look at Simon Roberts's snapshots of Loulou Van Damme — her beautiful, lined face; gray hair wrapped in a scarf; loose, authentically bohemian clothing; and piles of jewelry — and fell in love. We could all feel immediately the force of the life that had created her fantastic style and captured our imaginations.


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T Magazine: In the Air | Tribal Beauty

The glories of African design, from vibrant patterned prints to regal embellishment, are yet again influencing the arts.

In our video, Charlotte di Carcaci discusses how African prints, beadwork and culture have become a source of inspiration for today's fashion.

Fashion is once again tapping the great African continent for inspiration, from Givenchy's mosaic-print jersey dress (left) to the geometric tapestry on a new Burberry Prorsum bag (bottom right). In the 1970s, the Somali supermodel Iman was photographed for Vogue in resplendent attire (center left). Her regal pose is echoed in Jean Dunand's 1926 portrait of the French milliner Madame Agnès (center right), draped in patterns reminiscent of the beadwork worn by women of the Samburu tribe in northern Kenya (top right).

The art of body painting, seen on the face of a child from Ethiopia's Omo Valley (left) and in the Ghanaian artist Owusu-Ankomah's 1992 painting "Jumping Jack" (bottom right), is a sacred means of expression within many African tribes. While the paint is thought by some to ward off supernatural danger, embellishments like cowrie shells, often worn as jewelry, are also used by West African priests in divination rituals. Decoration and color contrast, both of which are deeply rooted in tribal traditions, have been appropriated by way of Alexander McQueen's beaded cutaway dress (center) and Dries Van Noten's heeled sandal (top right).

The dizzying prints found in Edun's revamped line (left) were the height of fashion back in the 1920s, when Man Ray photographed the British heiress and writer Nancy Cunard in a daring look accented by bracelets stacked in the African style (top right). In the village of Tiébélé in Burkina Faso in West Africa, women decorate the facades of their homes with strikingly similar black and white motifs (top center), versions of which were borrowed for Diane von Furstenberg's spring collection (center right), a ceramic vase from Creatures of Comfort (bottom center) and a woven basket by Design Afrika (bottom right).

Repeating geometry, often a signature of African design, is seen in prints for Duro Olowu's fall collection (left), a sable tureen sculpted by the South African artist Sabelo Khoza and painted by Virginia Xaba (bottom center) and the ceiling of the contemporary architect David Adjaye's Asymmetric Chamber pavilion in Liverpool (bottom right). Complementary angular dimensions can be found in Pierre Legrain's Chaise Africaine from the 1920s (top right) and, more recently, in Donna Karan's leather pendant necklace (top center).


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T Magazine: Now Online | Summer Travel Issue

Whether it's the design of a hotel suite, the search for a perfect pair of swim trunks or the everyday act of getting around on foot, T's summer travel issue highlights the power of simplicity. We start in Todos Santos, Mexico, a laid-back surf town whose hippie vibes and reliable waves make it easy to pack light — a bathing suit and a few summertime knits should do. We visit India, where the bohemian designer Loulou Van Damme has channeled her effortless style into a guesthouse in the scenic Palani Hills. And in New York City, we step inside the Greenwich Hotel, where the renowned Belgian antiques dealer Axel Vervoordt has introduced modest luxury by way of a three-story penthouse created in his own wabi-sabi aesthetic. Elsewhere, the ladies of the Ferragamo dynasty line up for a special multigenerational portrait; the MoMA PS1 director Klaus Biesenbach parties with friends in Rockaway, Queens, where he's become the community's loudest champion; our critic at large Andrew O'Hagan writes about the transformative power of swimming while searching for the holy grail of trunks; and a trio of artists make time to break bread with their staffs. See all stories from the issue >>


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T Magazine: In the Air | Tribal Beauty

Written By wartini cantika on Sabtu, 10 Mei 2014 | 17.36

The glories of African design, from vibrant patterned prints to regal embellishment, are yet again influencing the arts.

In our video, Charlotte di Carcaci discusses how African prints, beadwork and culture have become a source of inspiration for today's fashion.

Fashion is once again tapping the great African continent for inspiration, from Givenchy's mosaic-print jersey dress (left) to the geometric tapestry on a new Burberry Prorsum bag (bottom right). In the 1970s, the Somali supermodel Iman was photographed for Vogue in resplendent attire (center left). Her regal pose is echoed in Jean Dunand's 1926 portrait of the French milliner Madame Agnès (center right), draped in patterns reminiscent of the beadwork worn by women of the Samburu tribe in northern Kenya (top right).

The art of body painting, seen on the face of a child from Ethiopia's Omo Valley (left) and in the Ghanaian artist Owusu-Ankomah's 1992 painting "Jumping Jack" (bottom right), is a sacred means of expression within many African tribes. While the paint is thought by some to ward off supernatural danger, embellishments like cowrie shells, often worn as jewelry, are also used by West African priests in divination rituals. Decoration and color contrast, both of which are deeply rooted in tribal traditions, have been appropriated by way of Alexander McQueen's beaded cutaway dress (center) and Dries Van Noten's heeled sandal (top right).

The dizzying prints found in Edun's revamped line (left) were the height of fashion back in the 1920s, when Man Ray photographed the British heiress and writer Nancy Cunard in a daring look accented by bracelets stacked in the African style (top right). In the village of Tiébélé in Burkina Faso in West Africa, women decorate the facades of their homes with strikingly similar black and white motifs (top center), versions of which were borrowed for Diane von Furstenberg's spring collection (center right), a ceramic vase from Creatures of Comfort (bottom center) and a woven basket by Design Afrika (bottom right).

Repeating geometry, often a signature of African design, is seen in prints for Duro Olowu's fall collection (left), a sable tureen sculpted by the South African artist Sabelo Khoza and painted by Virginia Xaba (bottom center) and the ceiling of the contemporary architect David Adjaye's Asymmetric Chamber pavilion in Liverpool (bottom right). Complementary angular dimensions can be found in Pierre Legrain's Chaise Africaine from the 1920s (top right) and, more recently, in Donna Karan's leather pendant necklace (top center).


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T Magazine: Editor’s Letter | Simple Pleasures

This issue might seem to have little to do with style: walking in nature, swimming in the ocean, eating supper under the stars or setting out to a distant locale.

But while some of our stories celebrate rarefied places and exquisite experiences, the message behind all of them is one of artful simplicity. Take, for example, the radically pared-down, three-bedroom penthouse suite the Belgian designer Axel Vervoordt and the Japanese-born architect Tatsuro Miki created atop the Greenwich Hotel in New York City. Vervoordt spent four years creating a humble, rustic abode inspired by the Japanese concept of wabi-sabi. His intention is for people to see the beauty in raw and aged materials as a reminder of the transience and imperfection of all things. (These lessons come to you courtesy of T, even if the suite goes for $15,000 per night.)

Our critic at large, Andrew O'Hagan, muses on swimming as a transformative state, one that conjures memories of childhood and the refreshing sense of losing oneself in water — and on the difficulty of finding the right pair of swim trunks. Liesl Schillinger praises the meditative joys of walking, and how forging our own path imprints a lasting place and time in our minds.

Style resides in how we think and feel and go about our lives, but small touches are also important: a chic, dangly pair of earrings worn with hair slicked back after a swim, a bathing suit that makes you feel worthy of the sea or an elegant table set with flowers from the garden.

People often ask where our stories come from. This month, a writer new to T, Michael Snyder, proposed a profile of a Belgian woman we'd never heard of who was building a small hotel — guesthouse, really — near the remote South Indian mountains of her birthplace. We took one look at Simon Roberts's snapshots of Loulou Van Damme — her beautiful, lined face; gray hair wrapped in a scarf; loose, authentically bohemian clothing; and piles of jewelry — and fell in love. We could all feel immediately the force of the life that had created her fantastic style and captured our imaginations.


17.36 | 0 komentar | Read More

T Magazine: Now Online | Summer Travel Issue

Whether it's the design of a hotel suite, the search for a perfect pair of swim trunks or the everyday act of getting around on foot, T's summer travel issue highlights the power of simplicity. We start in Todos Santos, Mexico, a laid-back surf town whose hippie vibes and reliable waves make it easy to pack light — a bathing suit and a few summertime knits should do. We visit India, where the bohemian designer Loulou Van Damme has channeled her effortless style into a guesthouse in the scenic Palani Hills. And in New York City, we step inside the Greenwich Hotel, where the renowned Belgian antiques dealer Axel Vervoordt has introduced modest luxury by way of a three-story penthouse created in his own wabi-sabi aesthetic. Elsewhere, the ladies of the Ferragamo dynasty line up for a special multigenerational portrait; the MoMA PS1 director Klaus Biesenbach parties with friends in Rockaway, Queens, where he's become the community's loudest champion; our critic at large Andrew O'Hagan writes about the transformative power of swimming while searching for the holy grail of trunks; and a trio of artists make time to break bread with their staffs. See all stories from the issue >>


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In Transit Blog: Wine Time in Nantucket

Written By wartini cantika on Jumat, 09 Mei 2014 | 17.35

The warmer weather may still be holding out, but pourers at the Nantucket Wine Festival won't be.

This year's fete will bring 600 wines from more than 150 labels to the  discerning palates swarming Nantucket Bay May 14 to 18.

Adding a new level of education and wine appreciation to this year's event will be a team of professional sommeliers gathered from some of the best restaurants in the Northeast, including Lauren Collins from L'Espalier in Boston and Michael Madrigale from Bar Boulud in New York. The 25 sommeliers will be on hand at winemaker presentations to offer guests more background on the wines.

But hobnobbing with the vintner and chef elite is the festivalgoer's favorite pastime, and getting face to face with the 2014 Luminary of the Year, Paul Draper of  Ridge Vineyards in California, will cost you.

Look for Mr. Draper and his 1984 Monte Bello Estate on May 15 at a five-course meal prepared by Dean Corbett, the owner of Corbett's: An American Place restaurant in Louisville, Ky. Hosted in a private historic home — as part of the "Great Wines in Grand Houses" dinner and tasting series — the $750 soirée begins with a Veuve Clicquot Champagne reception. (Other dinners in the series start at $85.)

That may mean missing the festival's annual Harbor Gala, also on May 15, a pairing of 40 wines and dishes prepared by award-winning chefs at the White Elephant, the historic waterfront hotel that also hosts the festival's signature Grand Tastings, daily.

Special festival packages at the hotel and its companion resort range from $375 to $3,600 a night during that week, depending on the type of accommodation.

Beach and ferry shuttles, afternoon wine and port and other amenities, like the complimentary use of a BMW X5 vehicle for those who book a three-bedroom loft, are included, as are tickets to the gala, entry to the Grand Tastings and dinner at the hotel's Brant Point Grill.


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T Magazine: A Passage to India

Having cut a stylish swath from Brussels to Bombay, the free-spirited designer and hotelier Loulou Van Damme has returned to her birthplace in the Palani Hills for her latest adventure.

It's only mid-February, but winter is already starting to retreat into the hills, leaving South India's fertile plains to bake under the pre-summer sun. After a year of weak rains, the landscape here in the Palani Hills — where the flat expanse of Tamil Nadu rises to the spice and tea estates of the lush Western Ghats — is dry.

Just above the coconut fields, Isla Van Damme (call her Loulou) walks onto the veranda of the home she's spent the last year building in this remote, largely unknown corner of India. She glances down at the table she's just finished setting — the colonnade of candles, the offhand flourish of bougainvillea set out for her first dinner party in the new house — then up at the sky. "There aren't going to be many stars tonight, but you never know," she says. "We make our own stars."

That's precisely what the 68-year-old Van Damme has done her whole life, building her career as a designer, a stylist, a restaurateur — you name it — on two basic precepts: "It has to be mad and it has to be beautiful." Van Damme, of course, is a little of both.

Earlier in the day I'd arrived here to find her overseeing work on the plunge pool she was having installed on one of the terraces below her veranda. She greeted me in a pair of tatty overalls and old rubber flip-flops, wavy gray hair clipped above her ears. Back in Mumbai, Van Damme cuts a graceful, elfin figure in flowing caftans and gypsy skirts, beads and pendants, patterns and textures all layered with abandon; here in the hills she is every inch the happy gardener, though no less graceful for that. She coos adoringly to her cows, Lakshmi and Sita (she uses their milk for homemade paneer and yogurt), and putters away for hours in the nursery where she's raising dozens of plants from cuttings gathered in England and Belgium, picked at nearby roadsides and carried up from the garden at her previous home in Goa.

Van Damme's parents first came to India in 1938 in the hopes of rebuilding their wealth after financial troubles left them bankrupt back home in Belgium. Born in 1945, raised on the outskirts of Bombay (now known as Mumbai), then in England, Van Damme spent the first part of her adult life in Brussels selling her vibrant, gypsy-style clothes to diplomats and royals populating the staid capital city.

When she returned to India for good in 1999, Van Damme opened a restaurant called the Olive Ridley in Morjim, on an empty beach that is now one of the more fashionable seaside stretches in Goa — too fashionable, in fact, for Van Damme's liking. Tiring of the crowds, she moved inland in 2003 to a guesthouse she designed on a hill between two branches of the Mapusa River. People thought she was crazy to build away from the coast. "As usual, my project was taken very negatively by everyone," she remembers. "And I must say, the more people say 'don't do it,' the more I think 'but I'm right.' " And she was. The five-bedroom Indo-Portuguese guest villa, which she named Panchavatti (from the Sanskrit for "five trees"), with its lovingly tended garden, marvelous views and open, Geoffrey Bawa-inspired architecture, began attracting a steady client base of artists, writers, filmmakers and creative types. They came for the quiet, for the home-cooked meals, for the rooms filled with antiques and objects from Van Damme's own peripatetic life — but mostly they came for Van Damme herself, who presided like a patroness over a fashionable salon.

In 2005, while still running Panchavatti, she came on board to help style a shop called Bungalow 8 in Mumbai. The store's founder, Maithili Ahluwalia, says that Van Damme has since become "the godmother, the grande dame" of what is one of the most popular design shops in Mumbai, a three-story emporium of clothes, furniture, jewelry, accessories and objets d'art imbued with Van Damme's singular style. Through Bungalow 8 and Panchavatti, Van Damme has honed a distinctive haute-bohemian look that is frequently imitated in Mumbai, built on the juxtaposition of old and new. "Loulou's aesthetic has nothing to do with products or items. It's about a worldview," Ahluwalia told me, recalling her first visit to Van Damme's Goan guesthouse. "Panchavatti was the storybook of a person and her history. Every room was another chapter."

Van Damme sold Panchavatti in 2011, but she has continued that story at the new guesthouse in the Palani Hills, a two-bedroom cottage that nods to the style of English bungalows and French plantation houses built here during the Raj (the property abutting Van Damme's is a working pepper and coffee plantation founded by French Jesuits). There's the outdoor teak furniture; there's the handknit cashmere "leopard-skin" carpet, a take on the tiger carpets used by Tibetan monks for meditation, that took Van Damme's weaver in Delhi a year to complete; there's the Turkish kilim, similar to the ones she used to sell in Belgium; and there are shelves of books bought at art exhibitions. Storytelling, the feeling of life in process, is at the core of Van Damme's aesthetic: as much collage as narrative, constantly in flux, defined not by the perfectly placed object, but by the perfectly misplaced one.

Van Damme's birthplace, Kodaikanal, is a 90-minute drive from her latest property. Kodaikanal is one of the hill stations that the British established throughout the subcontinent as temperate highland escapes, away from the steaming, teeming cities. She was born here (her name is still in the records at the Van Allen Hospital: "They have these huge ledgers, and there I am: 'Isla Maria Van Damme. Birth: Normal.' Not normal!"), but Van Damme was raised in Marol, which today is a dense industrial suburb near Mumbai's international airport, then a dense forest far from the urban hub of South Bombay. "My youth was . . . I would say, junglee," Van Damme remembers, using the Hindi word for "wild." "I was a tomboy — short hair, in the trees." At 9, Van Damme was packed off to England to study in a convent school.

By 15 Van Damme was booted out for things like making clandestine trips to the candy shop in town and keeping a transistor radio in her room ("Decadent! I was decadent! Can you imagine?"). After a brief stint at a private school near Cambridge, she was sent to Heidelberg to study German for a year, and at 17 came to Brussels for the first time. There, she met her (now former) husband, whom she followed back to England a year later. After three years in London, primarily spent working in a store that specialized in high-end Indian garments, Van Damme went back to Brussels to establish her own shop, Santosh.

"When I see it now, I say, 'I was completely crazy.' A Belgian woman, first of all, is the most difficult in the world. The first thing she'll do is look inside at the seams. That's a Belgian: very classical, very severe. And here I am at 22 with my huge Rajasthani skirts, and I sold it to them," she says, as though still a little astonished. "Even our queen came. They all came — and they loved it."

And though Van Damme's personal style is more Banjara than Belgian, she is fastidious about the most minute details. She began to design her own collections for the shop, working closely with some of the finest embroiderers in Gujarat and textile designers in Delhi. Eventually, she started receiving commissions for one-of-a-kind garments — wedding dresses and gowns that she would sketch during long, in-depth interviews. Santosh became a kind of parlor for adventurous women with Van Damme not just selling, but outfitting and advising. (Even now, when visiting Bungalow 8, Van Damme thrills at the opportunity to sell. "I love dressing fat women — always very badly looked after by salesgirls. And I take them and say, 'Of course we can dress you!' ")

At 50, Van Damme reached a turning point. "50 is 50," she told me, "more than halfway through." That was when she decided to return to India for good. Then, a couple of years ago, she uprooted herself once again — a move that has brought her even closer to her birthplace. "Change, change, change all the time" is, after all, a kind of mantra for her. Moving to this plot of land in the hills is both a homecoming and a grand new adventure.

Despite her age, Van Damme says that she is busier now than she has ever been. On top of her work with Bungalow 8, which requires frequent trips around India, she is designing homes for a smattering of clients, styling interiors and photo shoots and, much to her surprise and delight, even modeling — and refusing to wear even a shred of makeup while doing it. "Loulou embraces age," Ahluwalia had told me, "because she embraces life." And life, as Van Damme's homes have so clearly demonstrated, leaves beautiful traces.

Now that her guesthouse in the hills is complete, she's begun work on the design for a second, larger house farther along the ridge. By the time that's finished, Van Damme plans to be growing as much as 60 percent of the produce she needs for herself and her guests in her own garden. She recently started making her own butter; she may even learn to make cheese. She's talked about starting up a drum festival with her neighbors to promote local tribal music and wants to work with a friend to improve sanitation and awareness about littering in the nearby villages.

It all sounds exhausting, but Van Damme simply explains, "I have to hurry up and have all my dreams now."


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T Magazine: The Making Of | A Camera Bag Designed to Keep Photojournalists Safe

The designer Miguel Hurtado's a-ha moment took place one afternoon five years ago during a visit to Bahia, in northern Brazil. He was snapping pictures at Carnival when a young boy ran up to him and grabbed his camera. The kid wasn't a thief; he was trying to telegraph a warning to Hurtado that there were some bad guys in the area and that he should put the camera away because he was about to be robbed. Immediately, Hurtado stashed his gear in his potato-shaped canvas Domke, a camera bag that advertises to the world, "I am currently in possession of a very expensive camera." "Right there I started to wonder, why does a camera bag have to scream luxury?" Hurtado recalls. "Why does it have to make you a mark?"

He queried the photojournalists he knew and discovered that few used a dedicated camera bag. Some even wrapped their equipment in T-shirts and stowed them in plastic disposable bags. So he decided to design a camera bag he could carry comfortably in Cairo or Detroit, modeling it after the kind of humble canvas shoulder bag you'd purchase at an Army-Navy surplus store and sourcing his materials from a Singaporean military contractor. Dubbed Able Archer, the bag comes in muted green, with hidden waterproof zippers and detachable utility pouches instead of the usual chunky plastic clasps and noisy Velcro. He tested it out shooting pictures in Cairo's Tahrir Square, Istanbul and his native Venezuela. "I didn't feel like a tourist," he says. "I felt empowered."

Hurtado will debut the bag this weekend at Pop-Up Flea in New York. He says he has no plans to take the bag to fashion trade shows, and while he hopes that the masses will find this bag on their own, he's pretty clear about his primary intended audience. "It's for photojournalists," he says. "It's a hard life, and this is my way of giving back to an endangered field."

Hurtado will begin taking pre-orders for June delivery at Pop-Up Flea, May 9-11 at Metropolitan Pavilion, 123 West 18th Street, New York, and later this month at ablearcher.co. Prices start at $200.


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In Transit Blog: For Older Travelers, a Site from AARP

Written By wartini cantika on Kamis, 08 Mei 2014 | 17.35

While much of the travel industry is scrambling to satisfy the digital desires of millenials, a new travel website from AARP, formerly the American Association of Retired Persons, aims to build baby boomers a bridge across the digital divide.

The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics reported that those 50 and older spend almost $120 billion a year on travel, AARP said in a press release. And that number is likely to increase as those travelers begin to find more time on their hands.

"I travel for a living, and on any given trip, most of the fellow travelers I meet are older," Samantha Brown, who writes articles offering travel tips and advice for the website, said in the release. "People tell me how much they love the effect travel has on their lives, health, and relationships, but they're not in love with the sometimes confusing do-it-yourself research and planning process."

So travel.aarp.org consolidated the process into one online marketplace. It approaches users from three angles: dreaming, planning and booking, using features like "Trip Finder," to survey a traveler's wants and preferences and then making destination suggestions based on their responses.

A "Map Explorer" function highlights attractions, restaurants and hotels nearby; and a "My Trips" page helps users store their search results, potential itineraries and any helpful information found in the "Articles and Destinations" section.

Partnerships with Expedia and Liberty Travel allow for bookings through the site.

So how does it differ from any other online travel hub?

First, AARP went straight to the source to design it, Sami Hassanyeh, the company's chief digital officer, said in an email.

After surveying a thousand travelers in the 50-plus age bracket (both members and nonmembers), the company found that most were frustrated with the time it was taking to book an entire trip and the number of websites needed to do so.

"We learned that planning and booking travel online takes too long and requires too many open browser windows," Mr. Hassanyeh said. "But more than anything else, people wanted simplicity and a comprehensive site for taking their travel ideas "from dream to destination," he said.

So AARP's web pages are designed to be user-friendly for all ages and abilities, with a clean look and simple navigation pathways, more like a mobile application than a complex website.

Popular "senior" cities (Orlando, for one) are a big focus of the site, but so are more exotic locations, like Serengeti Park in Tanzania or Marrakesh in Morocco.

It's just as important to suggest places they may not have considered, Mr. Hassanyeh said.

AARP plans to venture into social networking in the coming year, incorporating features that will allow users to share itineraries with one another and on other networks. For now, experts like Ms. Brown are there to offer advice on how to survive economy-class travel comfortably and tips for the "mobility challenged."

Discounts — a pleasure at any age — are also featured on the site, though more often for members.


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In Transit Blog: Travel Companies Boycott Brunei-Owned Hotel Group

Written By wartini cantika on Rabu, 07 Mei 2014 | 17.35

Travel companies are boycotting the Dorchester Collection of hotels this week after Hassanal Bolkiah, the sultan of Brunei, the small, oil-rich country on the island of Borneo that owns the hotel group, began implementing a new criminal code that will allow for homosexuals and adulterers to be stoned to death.

The code, based on Islamic, or Shariah, law, also calls for the severing of limbs or flogging as a punishment for theft, among other penalties. Implementation of the code has prompted protests in the United States by LGBT and human rights organizations, celebrities and travel companies.

On Saturday, Richard Branson, the owner of the Virgin Group, posted on Twitter that no Virgin employee would stay in a Dorchester property "until the Sultan abides by basic human rights." And cruise.co.uk, one of Europe's largest online travel agencies for cruises, said it would no longer offer customers the option to stay in Dorchester hotels in any part of the world.

"This law was barbaric 1,500 years ago and nothing has changed to make it any less so today," the company said in a statement on its Web site. "Any guests asking to book one of these hotels will be politely told why we are unable to fulfill their request and offered a suitable alternative."

The Dorchester Collection, an international group of luxury hotels, is owned by Brunei Investment Agency, a branch of Brunei's Ministry of Finance, and includes properties in London, Paris, Rome, Milan and Geneva, as well as the Beverly Hills Hotel and the Hotel Bel-Air in Los Angeles, where protesters have denounced the new law.

Michael Cieply of The Times reported that several Hollywood-funded charities and other organizations have already canceled or moved events from those hotels — the Global Women's Rights Awards, which are chaired by Jay and Mavis Leno, and Jeffrey Katzenberg's annual "Night Before the Oscars" charity ball, among them.

The Beverly Hills City Council has begun drafting a formal resolution condemning Brunei's new penal code and calling on the government to sell the Los Angeles hotels so that they will no longer be associated with the country.

But the hotels will not be sold, and implementation of the new laws will proceed, Christopher Cowdray, the chief executive of the Dorchester Collection, told The Los Angeles Times.

"While we recognize people's concerns, we believe this boycott should not be directed to our hotels and dedicated employees," Mr. Cowdray said in a statement released Monday.

"Most of us are not aware of the investors behind the brands that have become an integral part of our everyday life, from the gas we put in our cars, to the clothes we wear, to the way we use social media, and to the hotels we frequent. American companies across the board are funded by foreign investment, including Sovereign Wealth Funds."


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